Travels

Visit to the Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery in Glasgow

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Take a World War II Spitfire, Egyptian mummies, paintings by Van Gogh, Rembrandt or Dalí, animals from around the world and dissected times, a dinosaur skeleton, furniture designed by the great Scottish architect McKintosh, surrealist floating heads, typical costumes Africans, pistolons and arcabuces, a corner of the Amazon rainforest, a kind of Elvis style statue, an armor… Shake it all and throw it inside an imposing 19th-century building, made of red brick and baroque style, and you will have as a result one of the most curious and visited museums in the United Kingdom: the Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery.

This museum is one of the most entertaining and varied I've visited in my life and, although I spent within its 22 thematic rooms - spread over three floors with several wings - a couple of hours, the truth is that it takes much more time to enjoy and absorb the essence of the more than 8,000 objects and artifacts that are displayed inside.

With snow accumulating on every street, park and bridge in Glasgow, I walked as quickly as possible from the Glasgow Necropolis to the Kelvingrove Museum. It is not a short distance and it takes almost an hour at a good pace and with the streets in good condition.

When I saw the beautiful building that houses the museum, I felt happy because I knew I was going to be warm for a good couple of hours. When opening its doors and entering the museum, joy would increase. These are the most important galleries and objects that you can see in Kelvingrove:

1. Galleries of Dutch and French painters

Art lovers in the form of paintings and paintings have a good time to entertain themselves in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery. In addition to a small corner, on the top floor, dedicated to the large Salvador Dali and the story of his Christ of San Juan de la Cruz, you have a couple of rooms dedicated entirely to French and Dutch painters of the stature of Monet, Renoir, Rembrandt ('A man with armor'), Van gogh ('Portrait of art seller Alexandre Reid') and Gauguin.

Specifically, the collection of works by Flemish and Dutch artists is among the best in this pictorial school in the United Kingdom.

2. The Spitfire LA 198

The famous Spitfire hanging from the ceiling of the Kelvingrove Art Gallery

Nothing impressed me as much as seeing that Spitfire hanging from the roof of one of the wings of the Kelvingrove Museum building.

It is not a real size replica or anything like that. It is not about a real spitfire - the most famous fighter built by the Allied side (the English RAF, in this case) of World War II - which was built in 1944 with a Rolls Royce Griffon 61 engine and a 5-blade propeller propeller. He was flying in squad 602 (City of Glasgow) between 1947 and 1949.

For someone like me, a true World War II geek since I was a child buying the War feats comics and plastic soldier boxes, seeing a natural Spitfire is not anything. I had a good time contemplating it from all possible angles. If you do it from the top floor, you can even see the inside of the cabin. Look at that and imagine jumping into it and starting it up is all one.

3. Current and extinct animals

Scottish dinosaur skeleton

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